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LPMAN
Post subject: Beatles US Capitol Pressing Plant Information  PostPosted: Dec 12, 2005 - 11:49 AM
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For quick reference and interest.

Quote:

Pressing Plants


Capitol has had several pressing plants over the years. Two were in operation at the time when the Beatles began their career. These were Los Angeles, CA (the original and main office) and Scranton, PA.
LA's factory symbol is a * (asterisk). The LA plant closed down during the 1980's.



Scranton's factory symbol was a triangle in which I A M was written. Scranton used its 1950's style stampers on 1st pressings of the Early Beatles. A nostalgia thing? Scranton was phased out when the Winchester factory was opened (see below). Indeed, by mid '69, they had stopped pressing reissue Beatles records, although they did press copies of the new issues. For this reason, the Capitol albums pressed at Scranton from MMT back only appear on the rainbow label; there are no later issue Scranton copies. Scranton stopped making records altogether and closed down c.1973. The newest Beatles-related record I have from Scranton is a copy of Paul's "Hi Hi Hi" single.




In 1965, largely due to the Beatles' popularity, Capitol added a third factory at Jacksonville, IL. At first they used no factory symbol, but later used a 0 (looks like a zero or O).


In late 1969, Capitol opened a factory in Winchester, VA. This factory seems to have made thinner records than the others did. [Scranton was noted for its "thicker" records which used more vinyl.] At about this time, Capitol decided to phase out the use of the Scranton factory. Winchester's symbol looks like a tipped over wine glass.




The Scranton plant never made tapes, although tapes in the various formats were made at each of the other 3 plants.
 
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rayferrOffline
Post subject: Re: Beatles US Capitol Pressing Plant Information  PostPosted: Jul 23, 2006 - 02:25 PM
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Thanks LPMAN...every little bit helps....after taking your advice and looking at this record for almost 15 min. I did find a triangle with "I" on the top an "AM" on the bottom of the triangle.
Ray
 
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MikeyOffline
Post subject: RE: Re: Beatles US Capitol Pressing Plant Information  PostPosted: Dec 12, 2006 - 02:43 AM
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I found this and thought it might be interesting. Talks about cutting the USA edition of Gerge Harrison's "All Things Must Pass" 3LP set and makes refernce to Capitol's ten pressing plants. Well worth clicking on the link and reading the full story.

From http://triumphpc.com/mersey-beat/a-z/georgepeckham-apple.shtml
© Bill Harry/Mersey Beat Ltd.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Everyone seemed happy ‘till George approached me asking would I like to come with him to America to oversee the mastering of his “All Things Must Pass” LP as it was just the sound he loved on the LP. He wanted me to ensure that the USA release would match the British one exactly.

I was taken to Media Sound Studios and met their Mastering Engineer, a guy called Dom, short for Dominic. He seemed a nice enough guy and I showed him a copy of my settings which I’d used to master George’s LP. He first just put them on the side which I thought, ‘oh, here we go, I’m on his turf and he doesn’t like it.’ So I said, “Hi Dom I hope that you don’t think that I’m here to run your show, I’m only here to see that George gets exactly what he wants. I hope that we can do this for him.”

While in New York it should have only taken about two weeks to cut George’s LP. Well, it was a triple album and at that moment in time they used to press the records at ten different factories which meant sixty sides... 3xLP’s two sides each = 60.

Would you believe it, I had to quality control all sides before I could go back to England and there was a problem with about 60% of the pressings. The cutting lathe at the studio had a problem with the bearings in the turntable motor so while we were cutting a master you only monitor what you hear through the cutting head, so when the motor was acting up you didn’t hear it until you played the pressing.

Anyway the telephone at my hotel kept ringing daily as, while I was working in New York, Malcolm Davis had to work at Apple cutting room and as I had built up such a large clientele it was killing Malcolm as he was used to me working day and night. Mal used to be in the pub telling all how he had trained me and how good I had become, now it was Malcolm pleading with me: “When the hell are you coming back I’m f….g knackered!”

I did try to explain that there were problems with the Studios lathe but he just wanted me back. I told him that as soon as all the pressings are correct I would jump on the next ‘plane but not before.

When I did get back six weeks after I got there...
 
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ks45
Post subject:   PostPosted: Dec 12, 2006 - 04:30 AM
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Capitol did not print their own labels,each of the pressing plants had their own supplier

Scranton largely used typesetting from Keystone Printed Specialties Co., Inc., also based in Scranton. The L.A. plant largely used fonts from Bert-Co Press of Los Angeles.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Sep 14, 2010 - 05:32 PM
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Slight correction RE--the Scranton plant.The plant continued for a few more years as an independent pressing plant,after Capitol stopped using it.--I have records from 1973-75,on various labels that were pressed there--They still had the serated edges around the label,as well as the triangle in the deadwax.

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maccahunterOffline
Post subject: Re: Beatles US Capitol Pressing Plant Information  PostPosted: Jul 13, 2011 - 02:49 PM
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Scranton's factory symbol was a triangle in which I A M was written. Scranton used its 1950's style stampers on 1st pressings of the Early Beatles. A nostalgia thing? Scranton was phased out when the Winchester factory was opened (see below). Indeed, by mid '69, they had stopped pressing reissue Beatles records, although they did press copies of the new issues. For this reason, the Capitol albums pressed at Scranton from MMT back only appear on the rainbow label; there are no later issue Scranton copies.


So, I have a copy of Yesterday and today on the Rainbow label with IAM and with the subsidiary print. Would that be considered rare as a Scranton press given the short timespan this particular label was in press?

regards

Preben Vedsted (Maccahunter)
 
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namralosOffline
Post subject: RE: Re: Beatles US Capitol Pressing Plant Information  PostPosted: Jul 13, 2011 - 03:32 PM
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Hi, Preben. Hi, everyone.

A little additional information:
Scranton's original factory symbol (to February, 1963) was supposed to resemble a keystone, since Keystone made most of the parts that they used.
I.A.M. is the International Association of Machinists, the union that represented the factory workers.

Since the Scranton plant was open in 1968-9, when the "subsidiary" pressings were made, one can find copies of most records that exist on that
label style. Often, Scranton copies are the most common subsidiary pressings, but on a few records (e.g., Second Album, Revolver) Jacksonville copies seem to be
the most common.

All subsidiary LP's (June, 1968 to June, 1969) are harder to find than their original counterparts because:
a) the record was already off the charts, so they were pressing fewer of them
b) the label style was not in use as long as the earlier label style.
The same can also be said of nearly every reissue label style. For example, there were fewer orange-label
copies pressed than the others.

Most reissues aren't interesting to collectors, however.
Not counting label variations that are tough regardless of factory, or errors (etc.) that
are unique to Scranton,
Beatles related records that _I believe_ are harder to find as Scranton-pressed records include:
any Apple single in the 1800 series numbered about 1834 or higher.
Yellow Submarine LP
All Things Must Pass (George)
Ram (Paul)
Imagine (John)
Concert for Bangla Desh (George)
Wild Life (Paul)

Records that are tougher from Jacksonville:
"Get Back" single
"Ballad of John and Yoko" single
"Something" single (with or without Capitol logo)
"Cold Turkey" (John)
"Long and Winding Road"
most 45s from 1969
Most Beatles LP's on the Apple label with "All rights" print running around the label rim.
original-label pressings of Beatles Story (exists?) and Beatles '65 (exists?).

Usually, before 1969 Scranton labels are most common, followed by LA, then Jax (1965 on).
Exception: Jacksonville is more common than LA in 1967.
After 1969, Winchester tends to replace Scranton as most common.
The use of the Jax plant fluctuates, particularly with 45's. In 1976-77, Jax 45's are definitely
less common.

Frank
 
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annaloogOffline
Post subject: Re: US Capitol ...  PostPosted: Jul 14, 2011 - 07:06 AM
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namralos wrote:
... Scranton's original factory symbol (to February, 1963) was supposed to resemble a keystone, since ....
Heh, I always thought it was shaped roughly like an outline of the Capitol dome logo. This factory formerly was Scranton Record Company (founded 1939), which Capitol acquired in 1946. FWIW, the IAM union was formed in 1950*.

As a quick guide, nearly all Scranton pressings have machine-stamped matrix nos. (regardless whether the earlier or later factory mark), while nearly matrix nos. for all Los Angeles, Jacksonville and Winchester pressings have handwritten impressions. FWIW, all promo-label copies from about the early 1960s that I have seen, without exception, have the LA factory mark.

-------------------------
* Billboard, 30 Sep 1950, p.12.
 
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DaveyTheWaxManOffline
Post subject: RE: Re: US Capitol ...  PostPosted: Jul 14, 2011 - 08:19 AM
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Frank, with info like that, you're welcome here with open arms and champagne.
Annaloog, much love as ever.

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namralosOffline
Post subject: RE: Re: US Capitol ...  PostPosted: Jul 14, 2011 - 09:51 AM
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Annaloog is right in saying that promotional copies of commercial records were pressed in Los Angeles.
Some "special" or custom pressings were made in Scranton, along with early pressings for the Capitol Record Club.
Later pressings for the record club were made in Jacksonville.
This continued also into the period when "record club" copies of regular issue Capitol albums were made by Decca/Longines.
Capitol Record Club issues in the 90000 series were still made by Capitol Jax. So, for example, the Beatles album on
Polydor (In the Beginning) was pressed in Jax for the record club in 1970. Hard Day's Night (mono & stereo) was pressed
in Jax for the record club in 1966 and 1967.

Jax-made albums had stamped matrices until some time in 1967. After that point in time, they generally abandoned the practice.
The same is true for all NEW records from Scranton (such as the Magical Mystery Tour album) -- late in 1967 they dropped the
stamped matrices. However, reissues of earlier albums continued to use whatever mothers they had already created.

Frank
 
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