The Record Collectors Guild Forum Index

Post new topic   Reply to topic
View previous topic Printable version Log in to check your private messages View next topic
Author Message
mackdaddygOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 25, 2013 - 07:20 AM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Jun 29, 2007
Posts: 2036

Status: Offline
I just finished reading three autobiographies...

My Lucky Life In and Out of Show Business by Dick Van Dyke - A fun and interesting read. Mr. Van Dyke seems like a really nice guy.

My Anecdotal Life by Carl Reiner - Given that these guys were linked together via the Dick Van Dyke Show, it's a weird coincidence that I read these two so closely together. Lots of great stories from Mr. Reiner.

A Natural Woman: A Memoir by Carole King - This was the biggest of the three books, and it told me the least about the subject. I made myself read the whole thing, but it took a lot of effort. Way too little information about her recording experiences (particularly from, say, the mid 1960s onward, although she did share a couple of anecdotes about recording "Tapestry"...), but I now know all I need to know about her experiences dealing with crazy neighbors in Utah or wherever she lived. I honestly don't remember much from the book at all.

Probably gonna pass all three along to others with mixed levels of recommendations.

In a complete change of pace, I'm currently reading Native Son by Richard Wright. It's a pretty eye opening story. Once that's done, I need to go back to something a little more lighthearted.
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
hrtshpdbox
Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 25, 2013 - 07:34 AM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Mar 11, 2006
Posts: 5931
Location: Harrisburg, PA
mackdaddyg wrote:
Mr. Van Dyke seems like a really nice guy.


And an extremely lucky fellow as well, based on the events of just last week:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/08/20/213827376/dick-van-dyke-can-still-laugh-after-his-car-burns-to-a-crisp
 
 View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail  
Reply with quote Back to top
wand143Offline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 26, 2013 - 11:56 AM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Feb 15, 2008
Posts: 4314
Location: Sout' Side a M'waukee, WI
Status: Offline
I read the Van Dyke book, too, though I borrowed mine from the library...my only complaint was that it was too short. It's kinda like expecting a family size bag of potato chips and only getting a snack size. Still tasty, though. I've also heard the same complaints about the Carole King book - as much as I like her music, I've had to pass a couple times on picking it up. Currently I'm going through the music-related books in the Music Room - sometimes, ya just gotta be entertained instead of educated.

_________________
"That big ol' hole, little bitty record...nobody's gonna buy that!" - Carl Perkins, 1956
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
nealumphredOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Nov 26, 2013 - 05:29 PM
R.C.Guild-M-SMR
R.C.Guild-M-SMR


Joined: Jan 28, 2004
Posts: 2001

Status: Offline
Norman Spinrad's THE VOID CAPTAIN'S TALE, one of the most incongruous love stories that I have ever read. Oddly, prior to picking this up, I would have said that I had read every published Spinrad book but I'll be dimmed if I remember reading this a' tall. Needless to say, I am enjoying it . . .

I have had extraordinary luck finding used Spinrad books lately; I only mention this because he is an author that most people who buy him new tend to keep his books forever.
 
 View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website  
Reply with quote Back to top
j_loopOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Nov 27, 2013 - 11:56 AM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Jul 04, 2008
Posts: 912

Status: Offline
Neil, a while ago I followed one of your links from here to a site about books/reviews that you recommend (the site name presently escapes me) and found it quite interesting. Oddly enough a few years ago while looking for records I came to acquire a small cache of such novels. I like this genre a lot which is why I took them, but I'm by no means an expert. So backstory aside, the site seemed to like Malzberg and the only book I have of his is The Men Inside, so that's up next. Was hoping to have Beyond Apollo, but no such luck and even my inter-library loan can't help me there. Just finished Heinlein's Methuselah's Children and when I'm done with Malzberg I'll check if I've got any Spinrad...any in particular to look out for?
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
nealumphredOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Nov 27, 2013 - 12:46 PM
R.C.Guild-M-SMR
R.C.Guild-M-SMR


Joined: Jan 28, 2004
Posts: 2001

Status: Offline
J LOOP

There are sooo many SF writers to keep track of, and I am just trying to follow the '60s "New Wave" authors! The Malzberg that I have read U have enjoyed but canna remember what they were. He is borderline "hard science fiction," a sub-genre that I normally do not gravitate towards . . .

As for Spinrad: his initial Big Three that put him on the map were"Bug Jack Barron" and "Men In The Jungle" and "The Iron Dream," all must-reads. Personal faves include "Mind Game" and "Songs From The Stars."

The two that I recommend newbies begin with are "Russian Spring" --perhaps his most accessible novel-- and "Greenhouse Summer," an early attempt to deal with global climate change.

Finally, "Passing Through The Flame" is about a fictional rock band based on Jefferson Airplane and a Machiavellian manager. The heroine is based on Grace Sick but when I visualized her in the '70s when I first read the book all I could see was Stevie Nicks. The storyline is convoluted and can be frustrating to some readers but I just LOVE the damn thing!

Good reading to you!!!

NEAL
 
 View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website  
Reply with quote Back to top
LadyStarblade
Post subject:   PostPosted: Dec 03, 2013 - 11:43 AM
Level 5
Level 5


Joined: Nov 02, 2009
Posts: 175
Location: Southern Indiana
I'm on the biggest Doctor Who kick right now (watched it growing up, just now getting caught up on 'NuWho'), so I'm reading some of the paperbacks from the early-mid '80s. Currently on "The Five Doctors" by Terrance Dicks. Watched the episode recently, then found a bunch of the paperbacks for $1. Ahhh...1980s novelizations!

_________________
I don't care if it's 7inches, 10inches, or 12inches, as long as it's vinyl!
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
ChadFromCanadaOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Feb 11, 2014 - 06:08 PM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Mar 12, 2006
Posts: 3183
Location: Regina, SK
Status: Offline
I recently finished a book called Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, which has been described as a pop-culture look at economics but may be more of a work of sociology. Anyway, it was pretty interesting, and I can see why it was a best-seller (certain non-fiction books just have broad appeal, like this one). There is a sequel which I'll probably pick up if I see it in a thrift. I'm now reading Neil Gaiman's American Gods, and liking it so far (the prospect of the book being made into an HBO calibre miniseries would be enticing, though the project seems to have been in the works and bounced from network to network for a couple of years now). I was familiar with Gaiman due to his Sandman comic from the 80s, and recently saw the film adaptation of Stardust, which, for as much as it was a fairly predictable love story, was dressed up enough in an interesting fantasy setting and had an awesome sense of humour (Robert DeNiro kills it in this movie, man) so I decided to look out for his books at the thrifts; I ended up also picking up his shorter novel Coraline (sort of a creepy children's/YA novel I guess) that the stop-motion movie of the same name was based on (I have it on blu ray but will probably wait til after reading the book again to see how the adaptation went, don't remember the movie too well). Also a bit of the way into Frank Miller's seminal graphic novel The Dark Knight Returns, an awesome $1 thrift store find.

_________________
▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
jmillsOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Feb 11, 2014 - 06:59 PM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Jan 22, 2008
Posts: 1513
Location: Orland Park, IL
Status: Offline
I've loved pretty much everything I've read by Neil Gaiman (keep an eye out for his short stories collection), but American Gods is my favorite. The kind of sequel, Anansi Boys, was good also.
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
anthonyvpOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Feb 14, 2014 - 08:38 PM
R.C.Guild-SM
R.C.Guild-SM


Joined: Sep 05, 2005
Posts: 697
Location: SE Florida
Status: Offline
Baseball's Last Great Scout. The Life of Hugh Alexander
by Dan Austin
A good friend of mine who also recorded oral histories from former players of the negro league for the Hall of Fame.

Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and The People Who play it.
By David M. Ewalt

Straight Flush: The True Story of Six College Friends Who Dealt Their Way to a Billion-Dollar Online Poker Empire--and How It All Came Crashing Down . . .
By Ben Mezrich
 
 View user's profile Send private message  
Reply with quote Back to top
Display posts from previous:     
Jump to:  
All times are GMT
Post new topic   Reply to topic
View previous topic Printable version Log in to check your private messages View next topic
Powered by PNphpBB2 © 2003-2007 The PNphpBB Group
Credits