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pat5067Offline
Post subject: Classical music research  PostPosted: Mar 11, 2009 - 11:53 AM
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I, unfortunately, know very little about classical music other then some guy named Mahler seems to be the "Sinatra" of the genre, you know, extremely popular but not cutting edge.
OK, so even that's not even close to accurate, which is my point...I don't know classical music. (Though I do enjoy listening to a lot of it so in that respect I "get it (I guess.)Anyway, how should I start researching the mounting classical music I am acquiring? Often, I will pick up classical along with the lot and boy are these albums always in the best shape out of all of them!
For example I'm holding an album right now, Respighi- the Pines/Fountains/Festivals of Rome- Riccardo Muti and the Philadelphia Orchestra- Angel DS-38219-W.Germany pressing DMM 1985...still in shrink Very Happy
Is the cat. number the starting point? The composer-ole' Ottorino? The actual piece? Is it the artist who makes the album valuable? (has to be).
I'm looking for general value of these...is it a dollar disc or maybe a little more. I plan on trading the classical stuff at my local dealer and don't want to give him the classical equivalent of "Kind of Blue" for a buck...you know what I mean? so ,like I said, I'm trying to research them.
Any problem with listing a few here and getting some clues from you guys?
Is this the right section for lists?
Thanks, Pat

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vinyl1Offline
Post subject: RE: Classical music research  PostPosted: Mar 11, 2009 - 04:24 PM
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Go ahead, but you are very unlikely to have anything worth more than ten cents wholesale - like the one you just listed!
 
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Post subject: RE: Classical music research  PostPosted: Mar 11, 2009 - 04:51 PM
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Hello Pat, I'll give you my slant as a retired public school music teacher/band director etc.

I'll also be glad to communicate with you one on one, off list for specific questions. Just click below and email me.

Your Mahler analogy is rather good, particularly for the era in which he is THE MAN. That was a highly significant line however in that his éclat is more substantial in his ERA, which is called “Late Romantic” than it might be in other eras or to lovers of other eras.

Music history (and research) goes in periods or eras and is based on major composers. At the most basic level of understanding, it starts about 1600 with Johan Sebastian Bach (and there was more than one but Papa Johan is head and shoulders above his siblings) moves through Mozart to Beethoven and Brahms, Enjoys Handel and Haydn, then deteriorates just a little in terms of greatness as it gets to Tchaikovsky. Gives a passing nod to your friend Mahler and finally, comes up to fairly modern times with Prokofiev, Stravinsky and maybe Shostakovich.

Historically (and speaking in very general terms) things move from Renaissance to Baroque (with a spur called Rococo – a sort of ultra Baroque) Classical, Romantic, (Late Romantic) a sort of mixture (communications were getting better and faster) that is generally called Post Romantic with it’s spur of Impressionism (Debussy & Ravel, a class by themselves) on up into Modern, post modern and with the virtually instant communications and media of the last 80 or so years “all over the map.”

In early music history there is another interesting classification set (again speaking very generally) in that the eras alternate between arts (including music, as well as painting, literature and drama etc) are alternately based on logic (Renaissance) the emotion (Baroque & ROCOCO) logic (Classical) Emotion (Romantic) and even after that you find the alternating ideas pretty exist but it gets fuzzier along about this point.

I would suggest you begin your research by era and the era you seem to be addressing with the works you list is late Romantic, a period based on emotion. You will find out right away that Mahler is a sort of square peg in that round hole although he is considered sort of logically emotional in his approach. He was also quite late in the period so is kind of on the cusp. Respighi (Pines of Rome) is also in this same late Romantic, post romantic group (although the music is very descriptive/emotionally based – characteristics of Romantic composition) and is lots of fun and neat to hear.

There is a little bit of a start. Aren’t you glad you asked?

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MacJazzOffline
Post subject: RE: Classical music research  PostPosted: Mar 11, 2009 - 04:54 PM
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By the way, to all the sincere classical music people who I have just made sick and sent to the Emergency Room to recover with that sort of skate board tour of music history, it is intended to be just that.

Don’t do anything to turn off someone trying to be a believer.

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Post subject: RE: Classical music research  PostPosted: Mar 11, 2009 - 09:48 PM
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Er, uh, I don't know, Mart. I like your approach on one hand even though the other hand is in the emergency room. HA!

Man, Pat. If you like the music, why are you trading it away? You need to explore ebay completed auctions for values. You need to study the composers and their music for the real values, though. And research the soloists, orchestras, and conductors.

I have a nice thousand piece classical collection, opera and songs included here. Contemporary composers, too. it is more geared for the music than the value of the record, however. I do have some real valuables, though. It is exciting to find a load of NM classical goodies, especially when I know they are valuable titles.

List your records here in the classical section and we'll talk about them with you. I know quite a bit since this music is what I grew up with. I never listened to rock and roll or jazz or other genres much until college age in the early 80's. I had a nice classical collection before I was 16 years old and I studied the music, too since I was a violinist. My bro is presently a professional classical pianist living at NYC. He tours the world and has played with some of the best.

I'm not sure exactly what advice you are looking for. Are you looking for suggestions on what to listen to or look for? I hope you continue your interest in the music and am happy to discuss any aspects of the music with you.

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pat5067Offline
Post subject: Re: RE: Classical music research  PostPosted: Mar 12, 2009 - 03:12 PM
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vinyl1 wrote:
Go ahead, but you are very unlikely to have anything worth more than ten cents wholesale - like the one you just listed!


...and here I thought my classical album collection was a dime a dozen...you're saying a dime a piece...now that's what I wanted to hear!!

(thanks for the reply...and I get your drift)

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pat5067Offline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Mar 12, 2009 - 03:47 PM
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Professor MacJazz, your brief, but, enlightening breeze through the 15th-20th centuries is appreciated. (and thanks for throwing me a bone on my Mahler crack, I really haven't the foggiest)And although you showed a few examples on how I could start some solid research on the classics ,I kind of, well,was asking more in the mundane.
Like, do I use the cat. number of an album to search eBay and Popsike or is it better to go with conductor or artist? That sort of thing. Embarassed
Now I feel like I should go to the library and take out a book on the Renaissance era and start studying!
And Mr.Goldfish, I do intend on keeping a few around -can't get enough of that Mozart Symphonien No.41/40 Jupiter, (London Symphony Orchestra/ Claudio Abbada, ,1980, Deutsche Grammophon, cat.2531 273) now that's some jumpin' jive right there.
I think I'll throw a few albums up here for all to see and roll their eyes at. Who knows, maybe I can get a few dimes outta these records after all.
Thanks for indulging the rookie here , I really enjoy the talk.
Pat

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vinyl1Offline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Mar 12, 2009 - 04:45 PM
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Well, they're not all worth a dime wholesale.

If I, or any other experienced classical record collector/dealer, have the chance to pick through an unpicked collection to five or ten thousand, most likely we will come up with a considerable number of valuable LPs, particularly if the collection has good material from the 50s or 60s. A yield as high as 3-5% is possible, although 1-2% is more likely, something like one good-size box per five thousand.
 
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MacJazzOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Mar 12, 2009 - 08:28 PM
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Aw damn. i was having such fun!

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weletthegoldfishgoOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Mar 12, 2009 - 10:33 PM
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I had just typed in what I feel was a wonderful response and the computer glitched and I lost my message. SUCKS, really.

In short, research the artist first. If it's a chamber group like a quartet or trio, research the group. If it's an orchestral work, research the conductor. Concern yourself with labels and their variations and catalogue numbers, but I bet you'll understand that when you do what I first suggested.

I consider collectible lp's in the $25-$100 range and the valuable lp's are more than $100.

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