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barbiedollspimpOffline
Post subject: ask any question you have regarding rap music here  PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 02:54 AM
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rap and country music are both consistently victim to ignorance. people don't know enough about the genres, yet aren't interested enough to learn the truth. also, i've noticed that some people here have rap records mainly because they collect records. i've listened to rap music since 1986 (i was 6). i still have my run-dmc raising hell cassette. i consider myself something of an amateur hip hop historian. so, ask the questions you've (kinda) wondered, but never had an easy way to get an answer.

think sampling is just using a loop? think rap music is just samples and drum machines? ask about sampling or instrumentation in rap music here.

want to know what are the essential rap albums? by year? decade? region?

interested in clean, positive songs only? political songs? ask here.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 04:30 AM
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Back in the 90's I worked for John Carraro, aka the PhunkyPhantom. I was his helper at the now infamous Roosevelt Hotel Soul Record Show in NYC. I was payed well because in addition to normal helper duties I had to make sure that all these "producers" who were making big money in the rap game didn't steal his records. Stealing was something that was rampant at this particular show.

Why do you suppose that a show that primarily catered to rap producers had such a problem with theft?

Quote:
JOHN: One reason I stopped bringing 45's to the show is that I was getting ripped off left and right.Guys were switching sleeves on me. It really make for an uncomfortable day because you have to look over your shoulder all day long. I could name some people who I know have stolen from me, and it would just blow you away.
SOULMAN: No, no...actually, it wouldn't!


http://www.samplehead.com/worldofbeats/volume15.html

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barbiedollspimpOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 10:33 AM
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Moser wrote:
Back in the 90's I worked for John Carraro, aka the PhunkyPhantom. I was his helper at the now infamous Roosevelt Hotel Soul Record Show in NYC. I was payed well because in addition to normal helper duties I had to make sure that all these "producers" who were making big money in the rap game didn't steal his records. Stealing was something that was rampant at this particular show.

Why do you suppose that a show that primarily catered to rap producers had such a problem with theft?

Quote:
JOHN: One reason I stopped bringing 45's to the show is that I was getting ripped off left and right.Guys were switching sleeves on me. It really make for an uncomfortable day because you have to look over your shoulder all day long. I could name some people who I know have stolen from me, and it would just blow you away.
SOULMAN: No, no...actually, it wouldn't!


http://www.samplehead.com/worldofbeats/volume15.html




mostly, it's simple economics. san diego comic con has the same problems. i mean, there are always thieves who will not only steal your records, but your turntable too. the beatnuts are known for talking about (non violently) robbing DJ's of their stuff on records. But at the same time, you have people like pete rock, q tip, prince paul, madlib, questlove, dj shadow, etc. who are well known for being at record shows and shops and buy their stuff. of course, the price/rarity of records matters too. good luck trying to find an original pressing of eugene mcdaniels "headless heroes of the apocalypse" at all, and if you do, it's $100-150 (they just re-issued the record a few years ago). look at all the people who download illegally now. stealing music doesn't weigh on most people's consciousness, and i'd assume, most people didn't look at stealing vinyl as hurting the artist.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 11:13 AM
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I suppose there's thieves lurking no matter where one turns. Rather unfortunate that it was such a problem at the Roosevelt Hotel Soul Record Show.

On the subject of criminal/unruly behavior, I'd like to relate one of my very few experiences with the Rap/Hip Hop scene:

In the mid-90s, I was living in Northern New Jersey and had a part time job working security at concerts. Most of the shows were typical Rock concerts, The Grateful Dead, Nine Inch Nails, Dave Matthews Band, Blues Traveller, etc..... One upcoming concert took place at a smaller arena in the Meadowlands. It was a show featuring about a half dozen Rap acts. Expectations of potential trouble were very high, the thought being that rival "posses" would engage in violent confrontations. A chain link fence surrounded the venue and security was very tight. All concert-goers were very thoroughly screened. We wanded all the men entering with metal detectors and looked through all the women's purses. Aside from a few cheap pocketknives, we found nothing of concern.

The show began without incident. My job was to keep overzealous fans from leaning over balconies/falling and rushing the stage as well as corralling drunks and troublemakers. It was hands down the best behaved crowd I'd ever had the pleasure of overseeing. So.... all worries of violent thugs creating mayhem were all for naught.

OTOH, I could relate some absolute horror stories about a few of those Grateful Dead shows. Rolling Eyes

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Post subject: Re: ask any question you have regarding rap music here  PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 11:21 AM
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barbiedollspimp wrote:
rap and country music are both consistently victim to ignorance. people don't know enough about the genres, yet aren't interested enough to learn the truth. also, i've noticed that some people here have rap records mainly because they collect records. i've listened to rap music since 1986 (i was 6). i still have my run-dmc raising hell cassette. i consider myself something of an amateur hip hop historian. so, ask the questions you've (kinda) wondered, but never had an easy way to get an answer.

think sampling is just using a loop? think rap music is just samples and drum machines? ask about sampling or instrumentation in rap music here.

want to know what are the essential rap albums? by year? decade? region?

interested in clean, positive songs only? political songs? ask here.


I've only got a small number of Rap LPs in my collection, but I like what I have. I particularly like some of the late '80s stuff that has extensive sampling, e.g. Beastie Boys "Paul's Boutique" and Public Enemy's "Fear Of A Black Planet."

I'm interested in your recommendations of other LPs in this vein, particularly those that are clean and positive in nature.

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Post subject: Re: ask any question you have regarding rap music here  PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 11:59 AM
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CactusCowboy wrote:
barbiedollspimp wrote:
rap and country music are both consistently victim to ignorance. people don't know enough about the genres, yet aren't interested enough to learn the truth. also, i've noticed that some people here have rap records mainly because they collect records. i've listened to rap music since 1986 (i was 6). i still have my run-dmc raising hell cassette. i consider myself something of an amateur hip hop historian. so, ask the questions you've (kinda) wondered, but never had an easy way to get an answer.

think sampling is just using a loop? think rap music is just samples and drum machines? ask about sampling or instrumentation in rap music here.

want to know what are the essential rap albums? by year? decade? region?

interested in clean, positive songs only? political songs? ask here.


I've only got a small number of Rap LPs in my collection, but I like what I have. I particularly like some of the late '80s stuff that has extensive sampling, e.g. Beastie Boys "Paul's Boutique" and Public Enemy's "Fear Of A Black Planet."

I'm interested in your recommendations of other LPs in this vein, particularly those that are clean and positive in nature.



biz markie - goin off
biz markie - the biz never sleeps
biz markie - i need a haircut (this was the album that brought sampling to the forefront and got biz sued. "alone again" samples gilbert o'sullivan. biz named his next album "all samples cleared.")

my advice, check out his first 2 albums. those are essential (or you could get a best of). shouldn't be any cursing.


Kool moe dee - how ya like me now
Kool moe dee - knowledge is king

Im a huge moe dee fan. Not sample heavy at all, but clean. And moe dee is one of the best lyricists ever. "I go to work" is one of the most lyrical hit singles I've ever heard.


A tribe called quest - peoples instinctive travels and the paths of rhythm
A tribe called quest - low end theory

Tribe basically introduced rap music to jazz sampling. Low end theory is one of my all time favs. "Scenario," the song that introduced busta rhymes, "bonita applebum," and "i left my wallet in el segundo" are must hears. Tribe called quest are the reason i got into jazz. I wanted to know who they sampled. And when i found out, i wanted to hear the original. Q-tip did most of the production (largely unknown until a few years ago).


De la soul - 3 feet high and rising (the name comes from johnny cash's "5 feet high & rising. 3 feet because de la soul has 3 members)

This brought about more goofy, fun, rap. "Me, myself & i" and "potholes in my lawn" is hippy rap. Posdnous aka plug 1 is one of the densest lyricists of all time (esp seen on later albums). Stakes is High is their pinnacle (tho all their albums are great/good)


Monie Love - down to earth
Includes her best known song, "monie in the middle." Monie was a part of the native tongues (jungle brothers, tribe, de la soul, queen latifah, Monie, etc)



I'll list some albums, then go into detail later today.

Heavy d and the boyz - livin large

Big daddy kane - long live the kane (side note...big daddy kane, scoob and scrap had the best dance moves on stage), its a big daddy thing

Slick rick - great adventures of slick rick
Best storytelling album ever. Hilarious too. Must have. Also, his work with dougie fresh.

Queen latifahs first 3 albums, with black reign being my favorite.

LL cool j's radio, bigger and deffer, and mama said knock you out.

Anything by jazzy jeff and the fresh prince

I don't remember boogie down productions (krs one) cursing much (exception might be the sex & violence album, but criminal minded is a must have) BDP is kinda in the vein of public enemy.

Rakim and eric b. - paid in full, follow the leader, let the rhythm hit 'em
the only time i ever heard rakim curse was on "mahogany" - he says f*** once. Rakim is still my favorite emcee of all time.

You might also enjoy the fat boys. Get the rhino records release "all meat, no filler: best of the fat boys. Kurtis blow produced for them. Early 80's

Chubb rock was really positive. Kinda similar to heavy d. I've only heard his singles, but you should look into him.

There's ed o.g. & da bulldogs "be a father to your child."

Marley marl - in control volume one. Really, anything by the juice crew (marl, big daddy kane, masta ace, mc shan, roxanne shante)


Last edited by barbiedollspimp on Aug 23, 2011 - 03:00 PM; edited 4 times in total
 
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MoserOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 12:18 PM
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CactusCowboy wrote:
The show began without incident. My job was to keep overzealous fans from leaning over balconies/falling and rushing the stage as well as corralling drunks and troublemakers. It was hands down the best behaved crowd I'd ever had the pleasure of overseeing. So.... all worries of violent thugs creating mayhem were all for naught.


One exception doesn't erase the fact that "hip-hop gatherings" attract more violence,death and destruction than any other type of musical gatherings. This shouldn't be surprisng in that a large percentage of attendees come from neighborhoods that have the highest incidents of violence,death and destruction and many of the attendees that don't have this demented idea that they wish they did so they emulate the other trash.

I work with both blacks and "whites" who regularly attend such gatherings and I have heard them go on and on many times with great relish about said violence and sexual denegrating [and probably raping] of women. It's seemingly the centerpiece of the event.

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barbiedollspimpOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 12:53 PM
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Moser wrote:
CactusCowboy wrote:
The show began without incident. My job was to keep overzealous fans from leaning over balconies/falling and rushing the stage as well as corralling drunks and troublemakers. It was hands down the best behaved crowd I'd ever had the pleasure of overseeing. So.... all worries of violent thugs creating mayhem were all for naught.


One exception doesn't erase the fact that "hip-hop gatherings" attract more violence,death and destruction than any other type of musical gatherings. This shouldn't be surprisng in that a large percentage of attendees come from neighborhoods that have the highest incidents of violence,death and destruction and many of the attendees that don't have this demented idea that they wish they did so they emulate the other trash. .



I've been to well over a 1,000 rap concerts (still have all my ticket stubs). Only a few times has even a drunken fight happened. And even those weren't major. I've been to dj quik concerts with tons of bloods, and no problems. Hip hop has never had an altimont situation, or even a woodstock '98 situation. Mosh pitting is way more violent than anything happening at the average rap concert. I've seen people get hurt moshing.

Honestly, most rap concerts are filled with white kids from the suburbs. From public enemy to dead prez (more anti white version of PE). And they're usually too high to wanna do anything but chill.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 02:06 PM
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Would not really consider myself a big fan of rap, but i've seen Ice Cube, Beastie Boys (x4), Tribe Called Quest and Ice T. Never saw any violence at those shows, but of course that was the 80's early 90's and in Canada.
 
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Post subject: Re: ask any question you have regarding rap music here  PostPosted: Aug 23, 2011 - 02:09 PM
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barbiedollspimp wrote:
CactusCowboy wrote:
barbiedollspimp wrote:
rap and country music are both consistently victim to ignorance. people don't know enough about the genres, yet aren't interested enough to learn the truth. also, i've noticed that some people here have rap records mainly because they collect records. i've listened to rap music since 1986 (i was 6). i still have my run-dmc raising hell cassette. i consider myself something of an amateur hip hop historian. so, ask the questions you've (kinda) wondered, but never had an easy way to get an answer.

think sampling is just using a loop? think rap music is just samples and drum machines? ask about sampling or instrumentation in rap music here.

want to know what are the essential rap albums? by year? decade? region?

interested in clean, positive songs only? political songs? ask here.


I've only got a small number of Rap LPs in my collection, but I like what I have. I particularly like some of the late '80s stuff that has extensive sampling, e.g. Beastie Boys "Paul's Boutique" and Public Enemy's "Fear Of A Black Planet."

I'm interested in your recommendations of other LPs in this vein, particularly those that are clean and positive in nature.



biz markie - goin off
biz markie - the biz never sleeps
biz markie - i need a haircut (this was the album that brought sampling to the forefront and got biz sued. "alone again" samples gilbert o'sullivan. biz named his next album "all samples cleared.")

my advice, check out his first 2 albums. those are essential (or you could get a best of). shouldn't be any cursing.


Kool moe dee - how ya like me now
Kool moe dee - knowledge is king

Im a huge moe dee fan. Not sample heavy at all, but clean. And moe dee is one of the best lyricists ever. "I go to work" is one of the most lyrical hit singles I've ever heard.


A tribe called quest - peoples instinctive travels and the paths of rhythm
A tribe called quest - low end theory

Tribe basically introduced rap music to jazz sampling. Low end theory is one of my all time favs. "Scenario," the song that introduced busta rhymes, "bonita applebum," and "i left my wallet in el segundo" are must hears. Tribe called quest are the reason i got into jazz. I wanted to know who they sampled. And when i found out, i wanted to hear the original. Q-tip did most of the production (largely unknown until a few years ago).


De la soul - 3 feet high and rising

This brought about more goofy, fun, rap. "Me, myself & i" and "potholes in my lawn" is hippy rap. Posdnous aka plug 1 is one of the densest lyricists of all time (esp seen on later albums). Stakes is High is their pinnacle (tho all their albums are great/good)


Monie Love - down to earth
Includes her best known song, "monie in the middle." Monie was a part of the native tongues (jungle brothers, tribe, de la soul, queen latifah, Monie, etc)



I'll list some albums, then go into detail later today.

Heavy d and the boyz - livin large

Big daddy kane - long live the kane (side note...big daddy kane, scoob and scrap had the best dance moves on stage), its a big daddy thing

Slick rick - great adventures of slick rick
Best storytelling album ever. Hilarious too. Must have. Also, his work with dougie fresh.

Queen latifahs first 3 albums, with black reign being my favorite.

LL cool j's radio, bigger and deffer, and mama said knock you out.

Anything by jazzy jeff and the fresh prince

I don't remember boogie down productions (krs one) cursing much (exception might be the sex & violence album, but criminal minded is a must have) BDP is kinda in the vein of public enemy.

Rakim and eric b. - paid in full, follow the leader, let the rhythm hit 'em
the only time i ever heard rakim curse was on "mahogany" - he says f*** once. Rakim is still my favorite emcee of all time.

You might also enjoy the fat boys. Get the rhino records release "all meat, no filler: best of the fat boys. Kurtis blow produced for them. Early 80's

Chubb rock was really positive. Kinda similar to heavy d. I've only heard his singles, but you should look into him.

There's ed o.g. & da bulldogs "be a father to your child."

Marley marl - in control volume one. Really, anything by the juice crew (marl, big daddy kane, masta ace, mc shan, roxanne shante)


BDP,

Thanks for the detailed response! I've got a few on that list, L.L. Cool J., A Tribe Called Quest, Fat Boys, and Marley Marl. I'm familiar with some of the others through 'hits' that received airplay.

Biggest challenge for me is simply finding used Rap LPs or singles. Very scarce in S. Montana and N. Wyoming. Same story with Blues, Reggae, and Soul.

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