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jdunda9Offline
Post subject: Best Software to Convert Vinyl to Digital??  PostPosted: Mar 13, 2012 - 01:37 PM
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Hi.

I recently purchased a turntable w/ a USB port. There was no software included, so I have been using Audocity for converting my music. It sounds to me that the sound quality is a bit off when using this program.
Case in point, I purchased Iron Butterfly over the weekend. Sounds great on the stereo, but once the conversion is complete, the organ is just about washed out and the guitar is way up. I played w/ some of the preset EQs on the program, but can't get it right.

I'm looking for a better recording program w/ an EQ. There are a lot out there and I was hoping someone could point me in the right direction.

Thanks.
 
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Post subject: RE: Best Software to Convert Vinyl to Digital??  PostPosted: Mar 15, 2012 - 06:57 PM
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Audacity is a good program. The fault may be with the turntable. I have yet to see a USB table that wasn't a piece of junk. A good quality table connected to an amp or receiver with a phono stage and then connected to your sound card from the record out is the best approach IMO.

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GraemeOffline
Post subject: RE: Best Software to Convert Vinyl to Digital??  PostPosted: Mar 16, 2012 - 02:25 AM
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Quote:

I have been using Audocity for converting my music. It sounds to me that the sound quality is a bit off when using this program.


Your problem is the actual conversion of the analogue to digital - it has nothing to do with Audacity.

In your case, the conversion is done within the turntable, the digital output being presented at the USB port. So, in a nutshell, you're pretty much stuck with whatever quality conversion is being done (not a very good one, by the sound of it). Once in the digital domain, any application, such as Audacity, is capable of doing a good job of handling the digital signal. Personally, I'm no fan of Audacity, but I appreciate it is cheap and acknowledge it is perfectly capable of doing what you want.

You may be able to access the analogue oputput of the turntable. If you can, then try using your computer soundcard to make the digital conversion. That said, bundled (and on-board) sound cards are rarely of very good quality conversion and if you are after really good quality you will have to spring for a more expensive convertor. Greyhound makes a good point - in general USB turntables seem to be built down to a price and you would be much better off using a conventional TT with a proper soundcard.

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jdunda9Offline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Mar 16, 2012 - 07:42 AM
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I've only recently been bitten by the vinyl bug, so a lot of this is new to me.
I picked up the Pro-ject Essential USB player, because I didn't want to get a cheaper USB turntable. Granted the Essential is entry level, so perhaps that is the problem. The vinyl world is bigger than I anticipated, so I have my research cut out for me. I'm pretty sure I can access the analog at the rear of the turntable.
thanks for your help guys.
 
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GraemeOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Mar 16, 2012 - 09:44 AM
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Quote:

I picked up the Pro-ject Essential USB player, because I didn't want to get a cheaper USB turntable. Granted the Essential is entry level, so perhaps that is the problem.


I think you probably made a good choice. Although I've never had anything to do with this particular model, the Pro-ject range represents a good entry level.

You can access the audio directly and my next move would be to listen to the audio output (obviously, via a suitable amplifier and loudspeakers) to determine the turntable itself (and its pre-amp) are performing well. If so, then try connecting the audio to your computer sound card and do a conversion that way. Of course, you can do a side by side comparison with the USB output as well - that way you should be able to hear if there is any audible difference between them.

If you are happy with the conversion via the soundcard, you're good to go - if not, then you are probly looking at a better (and more expensive) card.

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KentTOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Apr 01, 2012 - 07:16 PM
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For me, the best audio editor presently on PC is Sony Sound Forge. Best burning program is Sony CD Architect.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Apr 20, 2012 - 10:20 AM
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One of my good buddies here at RCG uses Audacity. Here's the info about it that he sent to me sometime last year.....

I use a shareware program called Audacity. Google it. It's on my Mac laptop (for work). I then run a stereo RCA-to-1/8" cable that plugs into the audio in on the laptop. You need a proper audio in, not a microphone jack. Audacity records from any analog source, and it converts to any audio format you can think of. I go straight to WAV files. No compression, so it all sounds just like the rekkid. I then drag the files into iTunes and burn CDs from there. It's kind of time consuming since I record each track separately, but you can record an entire side and edit it too. I think that's actually more difficult though.

He's made several compilation CD's for me using this method and they sound fantastic.

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Post subject:   PostPosted: May 15, 2012 - 10:55 PM
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I had over 30 hours of voice cassettes I wanted to digitize, and my main problem was hiss, which was quite noticeable because of ups and downs in volume, and pauses. I tried several noise reduction apps, all of which were just ineffectual, until I found CoolEdit, and then CoolEdit Pro. It was the best by far, and all its functions worked as advertised. As for noise reduction, it did a wonderful job, but it took me about a year and a half, on and off, of tweaking to get the settings right. Even Audition, its upgrade by Adobe, wasn’t as good as CoolEdit Pro 2.1.
 
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GraemeOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: May 16, 2012 - 03:08 AM
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As a long-time CEP/Audition user, I agree it's a very good bit of software for doing this sort of work and, for years, I would recommend it as the best all-round program of choice. There are some additional and useful restoration tools in Audition that are not present in CEP, but a lot more code has been invested in it as a multi-tracking tool (which I don't need) and these days, I'm more in favour of Isotope's RX2, if restoration is intended goal.

None of the above negates my original response to this question. By and large, all DAW's will perform to an equally high standard - they differ mainly in the GUI - it's what you put into them that really matters and I suspect the conversion into the digital domain is the real problem.

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KentTOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: May 21, 2012 - 11:01 AM
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These days I like Sony Music Studio if you're on a budget or Sony Sound Forge.
 
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