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billsanOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: May 26, 2014 - 09:51 PM
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Rafter242 wrote:
I like that nobody brings up the fact that sound waves are encoded to digital when you hear them regardless of source.
After a sound wave hits your ear, it is encoded into discreet, electronic pulses that are then sent to the brain.


LOL!
 
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MikeyOffline
Post subject:   PostPosted: Jul 05, 2014 - 05:21 AM
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This is a very good question. Very few disc cutting studios have analogue tape playback machines these days and very few studios have analogue tape recording machines. Digital equipment is cheaper and requires less maintenance hence a lot of smaller studios displacing the larger studios of yesteryear.

Sony introduced the 1630 digital mastering system in the late '80s. This was a digital encoder/decoder that used 3/4" U-matic video cassettes. The larger studios and disc cutting facilities had them. On the next tier down was the Sony F1 system (again an encoder/decoder) that used Beta video cassettes. Everybody was in a hurry to mix down their analogue multi-track recordings to one of these two digital mediums. I cannot begin to describe the thrill of bypassing one generation of analogue tape to mix down to digital. It was considered a real breakthrough and everybody used it where possible.

Today, where anything is 100% analogue [AAA] it is a selling point and usually marked on the jacket as previously mentioned. QRP's first pressing job was Cat Stevens' "Tea For The Tillerman" and they cut that from the original US copy of the master tape that was used for its initial release in the 70s. You can see it here ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uby5-HinbGU

As vinyl record compound today does not contain lead, we will never hear a record the way we used to. If you want to hear records the way they used to be, I would be seeking out original pressings from back in the day if you buy any older titles. With newer titles, you just gotta take what you can get and that's OK too.
 
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