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wand143Offline
Post subject: Ten Records That Changed My Life  PostPosted: Oct 18, 2014 - 06:43 AM
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I'm working off the top of my head on this one so excuse me if I don't get all ten in...
and these are all in random order, by the way:

1) American Graffiti (soundtrack) - my crash course of Fifties music. I may have most of the 45s on this album now, but I had to keep the LP for warm, fuzzy nostalgia.

2) The Beatles 1962-1966 - getting the singles was a huge expense in grade school, so I settled for the compilation when it came out. I did indulge in the "Hey Jude" single when it was #1 in 1968.

3) Ramones - Rocket To Russia - I'd heard of it, I'd heard great things about it, so when a copy turned up at a flea market for $3, I snared it. I've been a convert ever since. 1234....

4) The Panicks - You're My Baby (45) - my first actual garage punk 45, this from a band from Akron, OH. I got it from a record dealer who just got in a batch of new singles and there were two we really wanted. We sort of flipped for it and I got The Panicks. A terrific introduction to the genre.

5) Moten Stomp - Benny Moten's Kansas City Stompers (78) - one of about 100 records my dad got from my uncle's estate in 1988 - they had actually been my great-aunt's, who was quite the flapper (and we found a photo to prove it!), and she loved dance bands from the 30's and 40's. I started getting into the genre after hearing the great rhythm and "oomph" of this electrical recording.

6) The Supremes - I Hear A Symphony (45) - my sister had The Supremes' Greatest Hits and played it 'til the grooves wore out. Personally, of all their great hits, I loved this one the best - the subject matter's positive and Diana's cooing of "Let it go on and on..." gives me goose bumps to this day.

7) Righteous Bros. - Unchained Melody (45) - the first slow dance I ever danced with the future Mrs. wand - neither of us knew what that song would lead to.

8) Al Jarreau - We're In This Love Together (45) - actually, it led to this: our first dance as man & wife. 18 years later, people still talk about how much fun they had at the reception.

9) The Shag - Stop And Listen (45) - another garage punk record, but this was first heard back in grade school - my cousin had my aunt's old record collection and he used to play it for me. I don't think either of us realized it was a local group. I've since acquired three copies of this: my aunt's personal copy (on the promise it never gets sold), a yellow/green label promo, and a stock copy fully autographed by the band.

10) Dick Clark's 20 Years Of Rock & Roll (LP) - OK, this wasn't the greatest comp out there - the version of "Crying In The Chapel" was a re-recording and the Shangri-Las' "Leader Of The Pack" has the edited second verse - but it was a good enough variety to increase interest in stuff beyond the pop crap I was accustomed to in the early 70s. It was also my introduction to a little number by The Kingsmen....

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Post subject:   PostPosted: Oct 18, 2014 - 10:53 PM
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…as most here are aware I like to present exhaustive lists for categories like this (which I still may do) but the most life changing record for me absolutely has to be Kiss ~ debut (1974). This is my era of Kiss. Please make note of the year. The original Kiss Army (of which I was a part of) existed, and subsequently dropped, Kiss before it became an “official” and grossly over-marketed commodity.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Oct 20, 2014 - 10:52 AM
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For me it was "Meet The Beatles" in 1964. That lasted until 1967 when my older brother put a new LP on the Heath kit my father built. It was side one of "Are you Experienced" and those first notes of "Purple Haze" nearly knocked me down, it was almost "call the paramedics, quick". Shocked

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Post subject: Re: Ten Records That Changed My Life  PostPosted: Oct 20, 2014 - 10:26 PM
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wand143 wrote:
I'm working off the top of my head on this one so excuse me if I don't get all ten in...
and these are all in random order, by the way:

1) American Graffiti (soundtrack) - my crash course of Fifties music. I may have most of the 45s on this album now, but I had to keep the LP for warm, fuzzy nostalgia.

10) Dick Clark's 20 Years Of Rock & Roll (LP) - OK, this wasn't the greatest comp out there - the version of "Crying In The Chapel" was a re-recording and the Shangri-Las' "Leader Of The Pack" has the edited second verse - but it was a good enough variety to increase interest in stuff beyond the pop crap I was accustomed to in the early 70s. It was also my introduction to a little number by The Kingsmen....


Both of these compilations swung me down my road as well. I wanna say I bought them at thrifts in Abilene back in the early 90s. I listened just a bit to the Dick Clark thing, but the American Graffiti lps - and movie- defined me and who I was to be for quite some time. I never had a 'hot rod', but did own a boss '66 Mustang- and dreamed of cruising nights as depicted in the movie. Rayon shirts, engineer boots, white bucks, black and white pomade, gabardine jackets, big E levis. Jetting off to rockabilly weekends in Atlanta and Austin and Green Bay and Las Vegas and Indianapolis. The 90s and early 2000s were a good time. A really good time.

1) American Graffiti - as mentioned

2) Starday/Dixie Rockabillys Vol. 1- This was actually a cassette I bought in a random stop at pawn shop just off of Fort Hood in 1992, but it was released as an lp as well. LIFE CHANGER in million ways. "Ol' Luella" just killed me. And Joe Poovey and Sonny Fisher… just wow, wow, and wow.

3) Highs In The Mid Sixties Volume 13: Texas Part 3 Another life changer. So much punk goodness. And much of it is actually from Texas. "Foolish Baby" by the Briks is godlike and truly punk. Those chords are HUGE and the drums just wear you out. And "Let's Move" by the Night Crawlers… that was what 60s teen punk should sound like I thought. And think. Still dream of a copy.

4) My Uncle Glenn's lp collection… Hank Thompson and George Jones and Ernest Tubb lps for days. I got- and get- such an education from that collection.

5) I'm Gone by the Continentals on Gaylo- by first 'rare' local garage 45. I actually had something on the old G45 list. So proud. I've been through 4 or so copies since, but this record really sparked my interest in collecting local music, which I now obsess over.

6) NoMountain Records… a label from Midland that I obsess over. 60+ releases and I have maybe a third them and don't know what else is on the label except for a 7" by Research. So everything I find is completely new. Scoring records by Precision and Lust (both hard rock from Midland) and folk by the Ragars and Joseph Brunelle were amazing times (at their highest those 4 records would book for almost $800 all together). Brunelle's "Highways of Your Mind" remains one of my favorite songs ever. As is "As The Day Grows Tired" by Will and James Ragar. Most of the records on the label are bad, but every once in a while something interesting turns up like the guitar soli single which was my last find. If anyone has anything on this label HOLLER AT ME. I'll pay decent money for this stuff you would otherwise throw out (No Shine or Marbles please). At some point I need to put together best of "bootleg" for pals. http://lonestarstomp.blogspot.com/search/label/NoMountain

7) Jim Sullivan - UFO I'll never own the original release of this lp, but did find the Century City remix in a HPB in Round Rock a few years back. One of the greatest albums ever. So much emotion and atmosphere. Jim was so good. Shame about that disappearing into thin air thing.

8 ) Urge for Going by Tom Rush or George Hamilton IV. I have the Tom Rush lp- so good. And I have the George Hamilton single. I cannot get down with Joni's original, but can listen to George and Tom all day long. So good.

9) I'm So Lonesome I could Cry by Hank Williams on an MGM 78. I first got into this via Jr's EXCELLENT remake on that soundtrack lp. It actually took me a while before I could really appreciate the original. Damn… what a song. Hadn't listened in a while, but it still gets me right THERE.

10) Drive Me Out of My Mind by Charlie Louvin on Capitol I know you're supposed to talk about other songs from the Louvin catalog, but this is a PERFECT tearjerking country song. Everything cries. Even the drums.

I could nitpick a thing or two on this list in a few days… Urge for Going and Uncle Glenn's country lps… but the rest of it is pretty concrete and has been for ages.

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Post subject: Re: Ten Records That Changed My Life  PostPosted: Oct 21, 2014 - 07:38 AM
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LoneStarStomp wrote:


7) Jim Sullivan - UFO I'll never own the original release of this lp, but did find the Century City remix in a HPB in Round Rock a few years back. One of the greatest albums ever. So much emotion and atmosphere. Jim was so good. Shame about that disappearing into thin air thing.


Amen to that! I purchased the cd reissue from Light In The Attic a year or two ago on a whim, and I love the album. I was just listening to the title track a few nights ago and marveled at how eerie yet tuneful his music was. I've never seen his later Playboy lp, but I wonder if it's anything like the UFO album.

The cd is a fantastic package, by the way. The booklet (thick enough to choke whatever) tells the whole story and is very well done. The disc itself had to rely on vinyl copies, but they did a great job cleaning it up. It sounds terrific.

The liner notes mention that there were two versions of the album released on different labels back in the day, and the second version was remixed (which, I reckon, is the Century City version you mentioned). That got me wondering if there's a huge difference in the two releases. Any thoughts?
 
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wand143Offline
Post subject: RE: Re: Ten Records That Changed My Life  PostPosted: Oct 25, 2014 - 06:48 AM
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Did I mention my list was not definitive? Turns out I had a "Ten Records That Changed My Life II" brewing inside me after I did this list:
Elmore James - Anna Lee (Fire) - my introduction to The Man - okay, so the licks are a little repetitious after a while, but they still grab your gut.
Fleetwood Mac - English Rose (Epic) / Mr. Wonderful (Blue Horizon - UK) - basically the same albums, slightly reformatted. "Rumours" is great - THIS album turned my head.
Zydeco Festival (Various) (Maison de Soul) - wow, what an intro to the genre - like, "Ever had jambalaya before? Try some!" I'm a Clifton Chenir convert.
Pebbles Vol. 2 (Various) (BFD) - for some reason I didn't get Vol. 1 right away but that's OK - still lots of primitive gems on this. The Lyrics' So What" is STILL on my want list...in ANY shape.
The Ronettes - Be My Baby (Philles 45) - two words to best describe Ronnie Bennett's voice: "horny virgin".
The Go-Go's - Our Lips Are Sealed (IRS 45) - hey, shut up, Belinda Carlisle is cute and she has a great voice. Yes, I had a crush on her in the early 80s.
Otis Redding - I Can't Turn You Loose (Volt 45) - try staying still while listening to this...I dare you.
Mother's Patriotic Apple Pie - Wild Vacation (NorG 45) - psychedelic guitars with phasing and groovy lyrics? NO, a surf record from South Bend, Indiana with some of the WORST production ever cut into vinyl! Like Mr. Dixon wrote, you can't judge a book by looking at the cover.
Night Club '67 (Various) (Supraphon, I think) - proof that even behind the Iron Curtain, they could still cut some killer rock. Czech it out sometime.
Hasil Adkins - Chicken Walk (Air 45) - I first heard this on a "Dr. Demento Show" and I couldn't believe somebody could cut something THIS RAW and expect to make money on it...and it was recorded the same year I was born...YOW! Thank God Billy Miller preserved this on the Norton label LP "Out To Hunch". Not to be missed.

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Post subject: Re: Ten Records That Changed My Life  PostPosted: Oct 25, 2014 - 09:33 AM
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mackdaddyg wrote:
LoneStarStomp wrote:


7) Jim Sullivan - UFO I'll never own the original release of this lp, but did find the Century City remix in a HPB in Round Rock a few years back. One of the greatest albums ever. So much emotion and atmosphere. Jim was so good. Shame about that disappearing into thin air thing.


Amen to that! I purchased the cd reissue from Light In The Attic a year or two ago on a whim, and I love the album. I was just listening to the title track a few nights ago and marveled at how eerie yet tuneful his music was. I've never seen his later Playboy lp, but I wonder if it's anything like the UFO album.

The cd is a fantastic package, by the way. The booklet (thick enough to choke whatever) tells the whole story and is very well done. The disc itself had to rely on vinyl copies, but they did a great job cleaning it up. It sounds terrific.

The liner notes mention that there were two versions of the album released on different labels back in the day, and the second version was remixed (which, I reckon, is the Century City version you mentioned). That got me wondering if there's a huge difference in the two releases. Any thoughts?


The first version is what Light In the Attic issued… Earl Palmer's drums are way out front. The Century City release has the drums pulled back into the mix. I have the Monnie mix on my phone so it gets listened to in the car. And the Century City release is what gets spun in the record room. The Monnie set feels more out there and the remix is a bit more tidy.

Jim's Playboy lp gets a bit of flack, but I think it is pretty good. Really good. Sure… a bit of a downer after the amazing "UFO". But as an lp by itself… most artists never have a single release this good. A case of living in the shadow of the elder sibling.

Here's a link to the whole Playboy lp…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6uoLgJfWbs&spfreload=10
I really dig "Tea Leaves", "Tom Cat", "Lonesome Picker" and the remake of "Plain To See". The "Sandman" remake misses the mark completely.

And thank you youtube uploader for the cool cover scan… which you swiped from my blog with no credit whatsoever. So kind… so very kind.

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Post subject:   PostPosted: Oct 25, 2014 - 10:27 PM
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I'll keep my list to vinyl only. # of cd's have impacted me as well...in various ways of course. Listing only 10 ten seems impossible. Let alone 10 from a variety of genres. More than 10 off the top of my head....sorry. Rolling Eyes

Rock/Prog/Misc:
Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick
Kiss - Alive
Max Webster - Live Magnetic Air
Frank Zappa - Too many to list.
Jeff Beck - Wired
Canned Heat - S/T
Doors - S/T
Gentle Giant - Octopus
Jimi Hendrix Experience - Are You Experienced
Pink Floyd - Meddle
Rush - too many to list.
Triumph - Thunder Seven
Uriah Heep - Demons & Wizards
Neil Young - Too many to list.
The Cure - Disintegration
Dire Straits - Communique

Metal - Heavy:
Judas Priest - Sad Wings of Destiny
Metallica - Kill Em All & Ride the Lightning
Motorhead - no Sleep Till Hammersmith
Black Sabbath - We Sold Our Soul for Rock n Roll
Iron Maiden - Number of the Beast
Ozzy - Blizzard of Oz
Anvil - Metal on Metal
Celtic Frost - Morbid Tales
Destruction - Sentence of Death (EP)
DRI - Dealing With It
Exodus - bonded By Blood
Manowar - Battle Hymns
Mercyful Fate - Don't Break The Oath
Rollins Band - Do It
Stormtroopers of Death - Speak English or Die

Jazz-Fusion
George Benson - Breezin
George Benson with Earl Klugh - Collaboration
Dave Brubeck - Time Out
Al DiMeola - Elegant Gypsy
Stanley Jordan - Magic Touch
Chuck Mangione - Feels So Good
Return To Forever - Romantic Warrior
Miles Davis - Bitches Brew

Thats 10ish .......right Question Embarassed Wink

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Post subject:   PostPosted: Oct 26, 2014 - 01:14 PM
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I will also keep this to vinyl records, so keep in mind I've only been collecting those for 7 or 8 years.

1. Cows - Taint Pluribus Taint Unum - I had every Cows album on CD but this, their first, was a vinyl only release from 1987. So I bought a cheap turntable so I could listen to it.

2. Problem was it took me close to a year to track down a copy, so I had to find something else to play. The only local record store closed down a couple of weeks before, so I went to Beverly Records (anyone ever been?). It took me two hours to find something I wanted, which was the Hoodoo Gurus Stoneage Romeos. I took it home and the first song was "I Want You Back", still one of my favorite songs and the first song I ever played off of vinyl.

3. So record stores seemed like a bust, so where was I to get records? I checked online and saw there was a record show in Hillside. From there I got my first Butthole Surfers record, their self-titled on Alternative Tentacles. I have all their albums on vinyl now.

4. Next I tried a local flea market. My first visit I came home with a mono Shadows of Knight Back Door Men, still one of my favorite (and few) garage albums.

5. My first thrift store visit resulted in ? and the Mysterians 96 Tears LP.

6. My first visit to another thrift and I got my first girl group LP, the Dixie Cups Chapel of Love, which is still one of just a few I own.

7. The first local album I found was kind of crappy - No Quarter Climbing the Rainbow, but it was the start of me tracking down all the local artists I could find.

8. A different flea market on Ashland wasn't very good for records, but there was an old dude there who sold me my first Beatles and other classics. He's also who sold me my first obscure Chicago 45, the Skylites on Ta-Rah (a doo-wop record, and by obscure I mean I've never found anything about the band and never seen another release on that label). I haven't been back there in years because it's too out of the way and that old dude doesn't go anymore.

9. My first tax scam record was Newban s/t on Guiness, so that introduced me to the weird history of those labels. I say my first, but I only have one other.

10. Last isn't so much about the record (Seiche Demo Press) but about the fact that it was the first record I recognized from reading about it in Acid Archives. That book affected my record collecting life more that any record has.
 
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Post subject:   PostPosted: Oct 29, 2014 - 07:06 PM
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In no particular order: Mean Ole Lonesome Train, Hound Dog/Heartbreak Hotel, from my much older brother; Louie, Louie/Haunted Castle-Kingsmen, Scratchy-Travis Wammack from my up the street neighbor; Meet the Beatles, Out of Our Heads and High Tide and Green Grass--Rolling Stones; Sgt Pepper and We're Only in it for the Money-Mothers; Are You Experienced-Hendrix; Soundtrack from The Harder They Come. James Cotton brought me to the Blues, one New Orleans artist let to another, probably starting with Fats but going backward to Louis and what Buddy Bolden might have sounded like. More recently, Fela took me to Africa...my gosh..I'm starting to ramble..It's an ocean of music and most are floating around on the surface.
 
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